Posts Tagged ‘Atheism’

What It Takes To Convert An Atheist

jesus

Caucasian Jesus

How Jesus probably looked like, sans Kefiyeh

A picture of a Palestinian middle-aged man. How Jesus probably looked like, sans Kefiyeh. Acknowledging this would make wingnuts turn into pagans, since only pagans at the time of Jesus were Anglo-Saxon.

Over at the atheist mecca of Pharyngula, yet another broiling comment section ensues due to the latest conversion of former atheist blogger, The Raving Atheist (who apparently will be “The Raving Theist” from now on).

Many considered the possibility that it’s a hoax (still possible in my book, but I really can’t say one way or another), or that TRA was somehow goaded or wooed into his conversion. A few thought that a spade is actually just a spade and that TRA reached a decision in his life to follow his heart, and that no “violence” of any kind was inflicted, nor trickery used, on TRA.

I for one am not going to predict or ruminate on the matter of TRA’s particular conversion story. I would, however, say that I know what kind of events lead people to completely change their worldview, and Jeremiaically call the atheists’ bluff of certainty in their lack of faith (says I, a die-hard atheist).

See, I believe based on the books I’ve read about human nature, biology, and the cognitive dissonance we so often employ, and my personal experience, as well, that humans think and feel very differently. Many  times during my life, I feel certain things which I know for a fact  are patently false. I admonish myself, banging my head on the wall with accurate rationalizations to try and alleviate the damage my intuition and emotions cause. Sometimes it works.

The point I wish to make is that atheists make the decision to become heathens based on what they think (at least, atheists like me, who simply spent a few weeks with Dawkins and talkorigins and did the math). When I “became an atheist”, it wasn’t as though I needed any special encouragement from Dawkins or from any other atheist spokesman. Atheism was merely a result of a long string of computations I conducted faced with the evidence and non-evidence available.

What I feel, though, sometimes has nothing to do with evidence, but merely with the way my brain functions.

I say all of this because TRA didn’t say jack zilch about what made him think that Christ is his savior and why he knows that God exists and that he watches over him. Nope. TRA believes, and “knows God” in the “other ways” necessary to know him that Dawkins alluded to when he wrote :”There are many ways of knowing besides the scientific, and it is one of those ways that are needed for us to know God”.

There’s a point to this besides telling my “fellow atheists”  that they shouldn’t be so snarky at the bible-thumper formerly known as TRA. I wish to give an explanation as to why TRA converted in the first place, while trying to base it on the modicum of evidence available.

When mom died, I still remained an atheist. I was lonely, crazed, inflicted with mental illness and growingly paranoid. I didn’t find God, even though in these parts, God is almost everywhere (metaphorically speaking). I did, however, drastically departed from the person I was. I became, in many respects, my former exact opposite. This is the result of emotional trauma, not of rational thought, and everyone, atheist or not, can and often will turn against his beliefs and convictions when pressed hard against the wall with the hot-poker of reality.

I say then to anyone comfortable in his intellectually-based atheism: your atheism is a result of your personal worldview, and like all humans, your worldview is malleable, and mostly so when reality throws a hot cauldron full of shit into your life.

Addendum

I wouldn’t write this post the way I did if TRA’s post about his conversion contained anything besides appeals to emotion, evidence-wise. With all due respect to what I wrote vis. the way emotional turmoil can change a person, when I use my head to think and not my heart, I take every input cum grano salis, and in the case of amazing conversion stories like this, cum multis granis salis.

Who’s The Culprit?

It is often said (mainly by apologetics, and in a way, that’s how they’re defined) that religion is not to blame for religious bigotry or for religiously-motivated violence. The garden variety argument is that even though evil people can be religious, it is not religion itself that is responsible for their crimes and evil deeds.

An interesting discussion has sprouted at Sisyphus Fragment, and most interestingly so, the line of defense was held not by religious apologetics, but simply by everyday rational, coherent, intelligent people. The crux of their argument is that religious people would be ignorant to simply use religion (or brainwashed, and the difference is tricky) as a means to do evil, and that religion is not the only thing that’s being used to promote evil causes. This is very much true, and since no one said that religion is the only cause for evil, quite irrelevant in the defense of religion as a culprit.

An interesting argument defending religion arose when someone said that religion itself is not evil, but can be manipulated by evil men, and those attacking religion is not only pointless, but can be counter-productive. I’m not going to say anything about it being counter-productive not because I can’t imagine it being productive, but because I much rather base such a claim on credible sources and not just scatter historical examples and thought experiments.

What I will say, however, is that it is an interesting reduction of human evil to say that no doctrine of its own is culprable, including religious doctrine, but that only human beings are. In that respect, Nazis aren’t culprable by their adherence to the party, but only by the fact that they gassed prisoners to death (well, it’s more complicated than that, but the example is clear enough).

Anyway, I can’t completely disagree with that, and in many respects, I sometimes get the feeling that religious people get too much heat merely by entitling themselves religious. Religious people, like everyone else, pick and choose what they think is right or wrong (and many of them will agree, even elusively, that their morals are not dictated by the bible. No surprise there). So, this definitely flies in the face of every graffitti that goes “Christians are shit”, and even though a lot of well-intending atheists might sympathize (especially former Christians) with that sentence, I don’t.

But is Christianity, itself, a culprit? Obviously, Judaism will share the same cell should Christianity gets thrown to the tanty, but is it guilty of the crimes people commit in its name?

My answer to that is “not exactly”. Evil people will find some other way of grinding their axes at other people’s expense even if the Abarahamic religions never existed. The flip-side of that is that good men or women, or good-intending ones, might wrong their fellow mortals simply because the bible tells them so. They might even feel a horrible pain while doing so, and will even hate themselves for not being committed enough. They will feel a two-layered guilt: sympathy to the oppressed and servile guilt to their Master, the one who decreed that they should do things they really don’t want to, and really think they shouldn’t.

So addressing religion as “guilty” is meaningful only in the respect of specific laws and decrees that plainly, in a non-open-to-interpretation-way (see Deuteronomy), state that evil should be done. This is not an indictment of all religious people and not even of all religious laws or canonized books. This is an indictment of very specific laws that were barbaric when they were written (by whoever) and they’re still barbaric today, and religious people and athiests who aren’t, well, insane, will agree on that.

Jeff, a charming soul who also happens to be a Christian, would probably never even dream of committing any crimes in the name of Christianity or Jesus Christ, and he would agree that killing homosexuals is an evil decree (he won’t agree that that’s what the bible says, but if he did, he would agree it’s an evil religious decree).

So the real culprit is between the lines, not on the cover of the bible. Religion does not go to prison, only the written text in its holy books that sends good men to do the work for evil ones.

Post Cemetry

Today I found myself contemplating what happens to posts once they die. The most circulated blog I can think of is probably Pharyngula. PZ Myers’ words are being viewed and re-viewed about a million times every month, and I wouldn’t be surprised if it gets to more than that on particularly spicy seasons. But even Pharyngula has archives, and I’m betting the ancient posts (especially those on Pharyngula.org, the older blog) never get accessed again.

Blogs aren’t like books, codices of carefully constructed words, designed, should people “read Kafka” or “read Conan Doyle” to be immortalized as character witnesses for the authors who created them.

But with blogs, words are ephemeral. PZ Myers and other notable bloggers might have written amazing and popular posts in the past, and those posts are forever forgotten. It’s possible that some literary jewels were created almost on a daily basis, and they’re all gone forever. In a way, this makes blogging a middle-ground between literature and journalism. Sure, responsible bloggers proof-read and carefully pick their post’s main topics and issues, and very serious bloggers even write multiple drafts – but no post ever conceived beats the literary manuscript. The worded piece of art that its creator proudly refers to it as “my book”.

All of this made me come to the realization that even when I write a post that actually gets read (the only example I can give is the post I wrote about the Yom Kippur riots), I know that it doesn’t matter much. People click on a link, skim through your carefully crafted words, and forget all about you, or blog, and your post the next day.

So what makes the distinction between “a person who blogs” and a “blogger”? Unlike bookwriters, it’s not any particular post or even a particular category of posts, but simply the style and history of the blog. Most Pharyngula readers aren’t science afficionados, and even though I love reading PZ’s posts on science, most of the time PZ writes about activist freethought and liberal politics (or about their antagonists).

This is, of course, not a problem in the least, but still, Pharyngula is without a doubt more of an “Atheist blog” than a “Science blog”, and that’s hardly a shame. Seeing the world of science through a self-avowed atheist with the charming and captivating worldview of PZ Myers is quite rewarding on its own. However, reading a science textbook is rewarding in a totally different fashion.

This also brought me to the realization that this blog will probably never succeed in its current setting. It’s not necessarily because I’m a bad writer (I’d say “smack average” would describe me well) or because I write about boring topics (hardly, I’ve touched some interesting issues, entirely not of my own merit, while this blog’s been alive) – I think it’s because this blog doesn’t offer the possibility of a posse like other blogs do (religion related blogs are a good example to cite). I do not offer “a home for like-minded atheists” like Pharyngula does. I do not offer a breeding ground for passionate biologists or even rather interested young peers.
Obsessed With Reality, like me, is destined to always swivel and veer to whichever my convoluted mind is up to and that, since I’m no celebrity, politician, or large-breasted female human, is of no interest to almost anyone (except other reality-obsessives, which I scarcely meet or know of).

This fact, although disheartening, is never going to be a death warrant for the blog. Writing things down endows me with some sort of releasing sensation. To be obnoxiously poetic, I could say that putting my meandering thoughts and ideas in writing “sets them free”, in a way – and that is something I’ll always love and require and fortunately, this doesn’t need a large readership to achieve.

Ghostland

This time, I’m going to skip the usual evil atheist rants about how irrational and hypocritical Yom Kippur is and write a paragraph or two (or more) on a rather striking side effect of Yom Kippur.

Since this blog, with its 30-views-a-day-max, probably lacks any Israeli readers who probably know of this by now, I think I would probably make a few eyebrows to be raised by writing that on Yom Kippur, there is, indeed, a complete ban on driving a car or operating ANY business or shop whatsoever. Not even the workplaces/businesses/shops that are open on Saturdays are open on Yom Kippur. There’s something so powerful about this national day-of-stupid that makes everyone kowtow to it.

I spent yesterday evening (Yom Kippur begins at evening and resumes for 24 hours thereof) with my girlfriend at her place, transporting myself between my city and hers on my bicycle, since car-driving is not allowed on Yom Kippur (unless you really like being mobbed to death by angry, hungry neighbors).

Cycling “inter-state” is not new to me, I often cycled to Tel-Aviv and back and even further than that. It’s always a treat and with the pro-bike I have, it’s often a lot faster than a car in rush-hour. This time, however, it was extremely annoying. The streets last night were festered with bright-eyed prepubescent idiots and their unwary parents, apparently very much aware of a lot of inane aspirations barring keeping their tiny eyes on the road infront of them and not, as so often happens, ending sunny side up on the kerb.

Now, now. It’s not that I hate kids. I just hate it when a few thousands kids get on bikes and start cycling around without being precautious. It’s this whole inane ritual every year that, since there’s apparently insufficient supervision of this “bicycle-holiday”. Hundreds of kids all around Israel are injured and sometimes even admitted every year. It’s as though the silliness of not drinking nor eating for adults makes them envious of their children. (don’t mind not eating for a day, but not drinking? Shit, that’s stupid!). Apparently, there’s some jealous incentive to make sure kids suffer on Yom Kippur too.

But this is, really, not that striking side effect I wanted to write about. Cycling back home today (gotta get back to work, and I’m STILL procrastinating), I cycled the freeway, almost entirely by myself barring the occasional cycler (most of the cyclers congregate in urban areas. I guess their parents can’t walk so much without eating or drinking).

Cycling around the freeway, above bridges and entirely in the open, the wind finally unhindered by thousands of cars and now fully rampant and extremely resistent to my efforts to cycle through it, I actually found myself at awe of this human endeavor to completely cease all productive activity for 24 hours.

In a free society, it’s probably for the better that every person rests (and definitely atones!) on his own free time or when the time is right, but to see the roads entirely empty, whole streets deserted, ground-zeroish silence plaguing the streets and boulevards that are simply always buzzing with activity – that is simply wondrous and quite breath-taking.

If this occasion or holiday or whatever it is that Jews want to call it was a celebration of, oh, I don’t know, just our ability to walk on our legs for once without polluting the earth, or a national day of complete and utter repose, including, for some reason, not using cars – I think it’d be a great idea, or at least a nice party-game for the entire nation.

It’s just so fucked up that us Israelies have to couple almost everything pretty with some stupid and irrational conjunction.

It’s FUN to cycle, it’s good to rest every now and then, it’s simply breath-taking to be enveloped in silence in a world filled with architecture.

Ironically, it is for this reason that I love Yom Kippur more than any other Jewish holiday. This doesn’t lack the same dose of st00p1d that all the other holidays do, but at least on Yom Kippur I get to actually appreciate the country I live in in a different, more natural light.

Pockets of Order

With much consideration to the tormented religious mind, I often contemplate what it means to think of our species, or life in general, as a pocket of order.

A lot of atheists who are into the evolution-creation debate probably know about the ancient and tired creationist argument about the second law of thermodynamics.

Now, I really can’t feel too comfortable talking about thermodynamics after I’ve interpreted and scribed for a deaf student who actually went to a TD course. There, I got a good glimpse of what thermodynamics actually is about and I wasn’t surprised to find out it doesn’t offer any evidence of any gods or creators.

But, I still have some idea of what this law is about, and I’ll put it out before this gets too messy:

the second law of thermodynamics talks about a quality or a physical entity called “entropy”. The thing really only makes sense physically if you take it into consideration with mechanical qualities in gases (although I bet the quality has some parallel in other phases as well). In short, entropy is just another variable in equations designed to predict the behavior of gases (that’s as far as I went in one semester, at least!).

The interesting part about the second law of TD is that it can be, in a not-entirely-figurative-way, a term used to denote a sense of disorder. That’s quite interesting, because it is actually a fact that in certain systems (ain’t going there), the amount of entropy always increases unless there’s some work/external energy or in English, “external factors” operating on the system. To put it in an example, if you take a low-entropy  gas and suddenly let it loose inside a large space/container, the atoms of the gas will, without interruption, aspire to become all messed up and pretty much evened-out throughout the space they’re situated in. The god of physics forgive me for the extremely loose and inaccurate description here. This can be called “disorder” because of a somewhat subjective definition for the word “order”, and in that case, I specifically remember what the professor said about “order”:

if you have a lot of ways of arranging a certain collection of atoms and, for some improbable reason (the improbable element plays a really important part here) – they tend to all arrange themselves in the same unlikely position – then the arrangement is considered ordered.

That said, order is nothing more than statistical euphamism designed to express improbable arrangements of matter in space.

The reason such arrangements, in the case of gases, for example, are improbable is because when there’s a large space for a collection of atoms to spread itself in, the energetic factors of each an every atom will always lead the atoms to be as evened out as possible as to minimize the amount of energy every atom has in accord to other atoms. This is just following a basic chemical and physical law: that atoms aspire to be in the lowest-energy conformation.  This is not some strange devil in nature that has strange whims – this is simply and observed and yet unrefuted reality – to be quickly discarded once refuted.

That puts even more subectivity to the term “order” – it means that the order we’re talking about follows from a definition of improbability based on our ignorance of situations in which matter does not follow the laws of physics that we know of. Order is nothing more than a convenient way of expressing a phenomenon in reality as we know it. There’s nothing about this term that means “special characteristics in life”. The “order” we have has nothing to do with the “order and discipline” that exists in, say, armies, goverment, police forces, etc. Even that “order” is nothing more than an abstraction to explain away certain obsreved patterns.

The reason I’m going through this whole caveat is because I’m fascinated with what this whole “order” thing really means: it means that us living creatures are doing something that is physically unlikely in a closed system. It is, of course, 100% likely in a non-closed system, in which tiny pockets of order are formed in an ocean of disorder.

My mind really starts sailing off when I try putting it into a more poetic use:

I think about the course of human history and the fact that even today, when there’s regulation books in the amazon river, civilization is still a tiny pocket of “order” in a messy sea of chaos. The order that exists in civilization is, of course, nothing like the order that exists in gas atoms. Actually, even though I didn’t go that far in the material, the TD professor said that things get really wobbly when you get the liquid and solid phases and eventually even to describe simple conditions, you need statistical physics to reach convenient approximations.

So it’s really stupid to actually draw evidence from thermodynamics to anything us humans do. Which is not what I’m doing in this post.

What I am doing is trying to make a poetic comparison between the two:

The order in our lives, expressed in the comfort that today and tomorrow are not going to be too drastically different from each other, the knowledge that it is quite unlikely for us to get killed or to lose a family member or a loved one, and that if something bad does happen to us, then someone’s going to pay for it.
Of course, even in the western world, it’s not like that. I’ve lost loved ones, I’ve had todays extremely different than their respective tomorrows, and sometimes life is indeed turbulent and unpredictable.

However, in many places in the world, even right now, people are whimpering in fear just like their animal counterparts in the wild. Women who are constantly raped know that it can happen again and no one’s going to help them. Men and children will be attacked, their family members will not be expected to survive – they live in a chaotic world with no rules or even a slight attempt to enforce them.

And I consider the kind of world I live in, with blogs and police forces and lawyers and imaginary lines in the sand that people actually do not cross to be as unlikely as a pocket of order. I consider it a rather striking simile that it is unlikely to have this kind of law and order anywhere in the world and it is much more likely to be utter chaos.

For the better part of human history, people have been obeying the laws of the jungle to survive. Of course, this has become much more refined in the modern world: people are not killed, they’re bought. People are not tortured into faith, they’re brainwashed or even simply tricked into faith – all for the personal gain of the leaders who perpetuate these faiths.

So the course of human history eventually bubbled enough steam and on the mountains of corpses of the past grew a world of smiling, fat, self-serving average folk who think they got the world by the balls and that everything’s going to be okay.

But this “okayness” is, again, something very unlikely. Like in TD, to perpetuate such “order”, you have to put in a lot of “work” into it. I consider the order that I enjoy so much to be the product of a lot of hard labor for a lot of people who want the same thing. It’s a win-win deal. In Israel, every person serves in the army for 3 years and that way we don’t get thrown into the ocean. In America, people pay taxes, obey the law, or are forced to obey the law by the hard work of the government and law enforcement agencies. The order is perpetuated by the muscle of those who desire it.

But the idea that this is a permanent situation is an illusion -we will always have to work to live in such a sheltering environment and we will always have to deal with the challenges the future brings to keep this “order” alive. This order could slip off our fingers any moment, any minute, and throw us into the dark ages. Our women raped, our men murdered, our children enslaved – the easiest way and the stupidest way to get personal gain out of other human beings is simply to steal them or remove them – and without working hard for a rational and moral humanity, that’s exactly what we’ll end up getting.

Welcomed to the Atheist Blogroll – annoucement

I have recently been added to the atheist blogroll. Before I’ll write a tiny snippet of my own about this blog’s addition to the blogroll, I want to paste the annoucement Mojoey graciously proposed here:

Obsessed With Reality has been added to The Atheist Blogroll. You can see the blogroll in my sidebar. The Atheist blogroll is a community building service provided free of charge to Atheist bloggers from around the world. If you would like to join, visit Mojoey at Deep Thoughts for more information.

So, first of all – if any Atheist bloggers happened to read this blog (it’s less than a month old, so I doubt it there’s much readership here) – I highly recommend adding yourself to the Atheist blogroll. I’m frankly honored to be a part of such a community and I’ll probably be sniffing around the atheist blogosphere a lot from now on.

Second, I should probably write a page, and not a post, about what this blog is actually about. It’s apparent in some posts and in the “about me” page that this blog is about Atheism, but frankly – it’s not just about Atheism. This blog will be full of favourite bits of Biology, dealings with creationism, both in Israel and abroad, science in general (and as I wrote, biology in particular), a lot about the deaf culture, particularly the Israeli deaf culture (this is probably not going to be a huge nexus of interest for the atheist blogroll, but it is a personal issue for me) – and probably an occasional post about martial arts, a field I have been occupying in for more than a decade.

I’m a bit busy with work right now, but I’m going to put some effort into writing a proper post/page about the subject, and I should also try and figure out how exactly do I insert the blogroll in my sidebar – for now, I’m just going to put a link to the blogroll until I figure out how to use a more sophisticated widget.

Cheers, and here’s one for rationality, reason, and most importantly – the freedom of thought.

No Gods, no Masters.

Free at last!

טוב, מר אינקוגניטו עבר לוורדפרס. כן, אני יודע, זה לא בדיוק המהפכה הגדולה. קניתי אפילו דומיין ואני בתהליכים של להעביר את כל הבלוג לדומיין (שעלה כסף, וכסף טוב!) משלי.

אני הולך לכתוב כאן גם באנגלית וגם בעברית ספציפית משום שמדובר בבלוג חו”לי ולא ספציפית משום שאין לי מספיק חברים\חברים שאוהבים בלוגים\חברים שמתעניינים בקריאה שלי כדי לקרוא את הפוסטים שלי כאן, וחוץ מזה, הסיבה היחידה שאני “עובר לבלוג עצמאי” היא סנטימנטלית: אני אוהב להיות עצמאי בתור פרילנסר מבחינת העבודה שלי, ותמיד אהבתי לכתוב, ואני לא יכול לכתוב בשום צינור “פופולרי” וstreamlined כמו בעבר.

עכשיו אני הולך לכתוב כאן פשוט את כל העולה על רוחי. אני לא הולך לתת קטגוריות לבלוג. זה פשוט הבלוג שלי, ובבלוג שלי, אני אכתוב כל מחשבה שחולפת על רוחי.

To whoever may be reading this. This is my first post here in WP. I believe I have quite a lot to learn. Firstly, I want to emphasize that I have no qualms regarding readership in this blog. For all I care, this blog can be entirely deserted and, AFAIC, be a personal diary, de facto.

This blog would mainly contain text regarding my ever-so-turbulent psyche. Thoughts and ruminations regarding, well, the world and beyond, and that’s it.

This means that if anyone had any expectations that this blog would be full of shiny pictures and music videos, then I guess ya’ll gotta move on to the next blog.

Now that I’m done with my little pre-exposition, allow me to introduce myself. (I’ll be writing the rest of the post in English now, but I’ll try fiddling with the Hebrew posts after I interrogate some of my Israeli friends as to whether or not they can read these posts and cross-check that with anyone from abroad reading this)

Name’s Shai. That’s as far as I go. That’s my real name and although I’ve yanked lots of pen-names out of my ass, I think the true essence in whatever state of mind I had while thinking of any pen-name is now long gone. I’ve been writing behind a keyboard ever since I was quite young. Consider that with the fact that I ain’t too old right now as it is (As of the writing of this post, I’ve turned 23 just yesterday)

I’m not a clean-handed man. I’ve seen some pretty nasty shit and at one point of my life, pretty much went crazy and for a period of about a year, done crazy shit on a daily basis, alienating my friends, loved ones, and eventually, the person I cared about the most – my girlfriend… This is one part of my past that I wish I could bury, but the least it does is moor me back to reality if my brain starts fizzing with anxiety and agony once more. I’ll write more detailed posts about what could possibly lead a (more or less) normal dude into becoming a monster for one year and then jolting back into reality.

In the first post, I really want to give a little glimpse as to who I am. This is why this post is going to be, probably, but not assuredly, longer than the others.

I’m 23 years old. I’ve been born and raised in Israel all my life. For the most part of the last 10 years, I’ve been an avid Karateka, that is, a dude wearing a white robe and doing “Haiiiii-ya!” at randoms pedestrians. Oh, and push-ups. Lots of push-ups. Since I haven’t done much of that in, say, a year or so, now I’m just a slightly plump rather heavy-set fellow with a very strong recollection of beating people to a pulp in a friendly sort of manner (in this junction, I just wish to say that I’m not naturally a violent person. But sometimes, people just push you to become that way. I’ve always tried to refrain from it, at least until I had no other choice)

I’m a science freak. I spend at least 3 times a day clicking my way through science and science-related blogs. I’m an avid “evolution-defender”. If there’s anyone out there who’s been to the evolution-creation debate, he’d know what that means. But to be frank, the more science I learnt through university classes (I’m a first-year biology undergrad with miles of books read)  the more I figured out that the political attack against the theory of evolution is a lot more boring than the actual, well-proven science of evolution (and of course, biology)

Although this comes rather late in the post, it’s probably the attribute that defined my personality the most, and that is: I was born to two deaf parents. The official language in my house is ISL – Israeli Sign Language. Sign Language, the deaf culture, and being a CODA – Child of Deaf Adults – are with no doubt key factors in the development of my psyche. I’m rather sure that posts regarding CODA-ness and deaf-ness will be a-plenty.

Other than that, I’m just your average eccentric, slightly-geeky, venom-filled-sense-of-humor-ish kind of guy. It’s hard for me to step out of my brain and try to give it a thorough description, but if anyone should ever be interested enough as to not only read the blog, but investigate who the hell or what the hell I am, I’m sure answers will come promptly just by talking to me for a few minutes.

That’s all for now. I think my next posts would be a redux of what I think about Batman.

Oh, and it’s going to be in Hebrew, at first.